Scam or No Scam? Examining Common Work-at-Home Schemes

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Scam or No Scam?
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Scam or No Scam?. It isn’t as simple a problem as you would think about the following six every work-at-home opportunities. I’d love to say: “No scams here, guys. Dive right in. “or” Just stop scams like this! “However, it’s not that easy of course. There is a fine line between a fraud and a poor opportunity to make money, but we all want to avoid all of that.

Read on to find out which of the six WAH jobs are genuine, and how you can tell if you’re scammed.

Data Entry

Online data entry jobs are certainly valid. There really aren’t many online data entry jobs, though, that actually pay decently, and this is an area that has been full of scams. You have to do your homework, really.

One question is how data entry workers compensate. Even jobs which are not scams in themselves are not always successful ways to make money. These jobs usually pay based on the performance, or on a per-piece basis, but it can be very difficult to predict upfront how much time the data entry will take.

And some of those positions are certainly scams. These aren’t too different from what traditional home scams operate, such as pyramid schemes, bogus courses, and free online tool certifications or payments.

Mystery Shopping

Though I’d say mystery shopping falls into the “no scam” category, I’d just put it there with a few caveats: don’t ever pay for mystery shop and/or cash checking opportunities, transfer money, etc. You would not have to pay for the lists of companies searching for mystery shoppers, application fees, or something else. And never for anyone to cash a check or wire money. Fake test scams are widespread. They take all kinds of shapes and shopping on the mystery is only one of many.

Micro Jobs or Short Tasks

Micro Jobs or Short Tasks can be fast ways of earning some cash. Whether a micro job is a scam, or not, really depends on who offers the job. And when I say “who” I’m not referring to the website where the work is described (although some are far more likely to contain scams and others), I’m referring to the person or company contracting individuals for these small, low pay employment. Those websites’ anonymity makes them a perfect place for scammers.

The idea behind these online gigs — as they are sometimes called — is very recent, and it’s loose meaning. For the most part, a small task that earns a small fee is described as one. The poster of the job will refuse the work on most online micro job sites and not pay for any reason; however, the worker’s safety is included in a poster rating system through which employees will post reviews. A platform with no reliable ranking system for its posters and employees is more likely to be riddled with scams.

Besides the likelihood that these are outright scams, you can think they’re just not a good way to make money because the pay is too low. Another possible pitfall of these gigs is that it usually takes a certain amount of earnings before certain companies payout, and so you can lose interest and never receive the earned money.

Affiliate Marketing

Scam or No Scam?. Affiliate marketing is a perfectly legal work-at-home enterprise; however, any opportunity that tries to offer you an “affiliate marketing company” is definitely a scam.

First let’s go over exactly what affiliate marketing is: Affiliate marketing offers goods or services by hosting links or banners on a website or blog, for which you are paid a fee for each transaction resulting from clicking on those links. You will have traffic to the web site to get clicks on those links and eventually sales. And so, the real business here is the website, which could also produce revenue from other sources, including advertising.

No one can offer you a ready-made affiliate marketing company, because it is not ready-made a website that generates enough traffic. They’re most likely offering you worthless information that could be had somewhere for free.

Multilevel Marketing or Direct Sales

But MLM is also the same business method used in direct sales, which is not really a scam at all. Legitimate companies such as Avon and Mary Kay use multi-level marketing. Many less reputable direct sales firms are marketing fraudulent goods, relying too much on recruiting or demand, rendering them simply pyramid schemes. Once you spend time and resources in multilevel marketing, you need to do a lot of work.

Envelope Stuffing or Home Assembly

Yup, these two are often a scam. Evite stuffing envelopes, making crafts, and the like. Think of it, stuffing or assembling mailing work just isn’t cost-effective, particularly because machines can do that.

Generally, the way these works are is that you pay for an opportunity but it is rejected for quality reasons when you complete your research, no matter how diligent you might be.

Article source : https://www.thebalancecareers.com/common-work-at-home-schemes-4045107
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